According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heat stroke is the single most serious heat-related illness humans experience. And the same is true for our canine friends.

attachment-josh-rakower-zBsXaPEBSeI-unsplash
loading...

Photo by || Unsplash

WHAT IS CANINE HEAT STROKE?

In simple terms, hyperthermia, more commonly referred to as "heat stroke," is an elevation in a dog's core body temperature.

Generally speaking, heat stroke occurs when a canine can no longer control their internal temperature. When dogs are unable to cool themselves down through panting or the sweat glands of their paws, the consequences can be debilitating and even deadly. Canine heat stroke sets in when core temperatures exceed 103 degrees Farenheit, and temperatures of 106 degrees and above are considered an emergency.

Sweat plays a very small role in cooling down your dog. Dogs rely on panting to control most of their temperature regulation. When dogs pant, they evaporate moisture from their tongues, nasal passages, and the lining of their lungs, cooling themselves as air passes over the moist tissue.

—American Kennel Club

attachment-kojirou-sasaki-mher7uNJZwU-unsplash
loading...

Photo by || Unsplash

TIP || The American Kennel Club advises against shaving a dog's coat. Contrary to popular belief, balding your dog during the summer months is actually counterintuitive as it typically leads to heat stroke. A canine's coat is akin to a heating and cooling system. It's best left alone.

attachment-jenny-marvin-sljtwVaSj08-unsplash
loading...

Photo by || Unsplash

SIGNS OF CANINE HEAT STROKE || from the RSPCA

  • Excessive, heavy panting
  • Labored breathing
  • Disorientation & drowsiness
  • Lethargic demeanor
  • Vomiting
  • Collapsing/loss of physical stamina
attachment-nima-sarram-VCIaqcBUiA4-unsplash
loading...

Photo by || Unsplash

DO NOT - DO NOT - DO NOT - DO NOT - DO NOT - DO NOT - DO NOT - DO NOT

  • Do not immerse your dog in cold water. 
  • Do not wrap hyperthermic dogs in cold, wet blankets. 
  • Do not force your dog to drink water. 
  • Do not pour water into your dog's mouth.
  • Do not use ice to cool your dog down.
attachment-karsten-winegeart-loJL4ijUobg-unsplash
loading...

Photo by || Unsplash

FIRST AID FOR CANINE HEAT STROKE || by the RSPCA

Dogs experiencing heat stroke require immediate and special attention to reduce their core temperature.

  • Move your dog into a cool and shaded environment.
  • Note the time you began cooling efforts. It will help your vet later.
  • Place a cool, damp towel underneath your dog. Frequently replace the towel as they can "trap and retain heat against your pet's body."
  • Offer your dog sips of room temperature water.
  • Take your dog's rectal temperature (and use a lubricating agent).
  • Mist your dog with cool, NOT COLD water behind their ears, over their back, and on their abdomen.

For more information on to prepare for or treat canine heat stroke, contact your local veterinarian. 

attachment-flouffy-VW2HGWgtIfw-unsplash
loading...

Photo by || Unsplash

Get our free mobile app

If You See Your Dog Nibbling These in Boise, Get to the Vet ASAP

If you see your dog nibbling on mushrooms, take them to the vet right away. While some may not be dangerous, there are a few mushroom toxins that can cause serious harm to your pet.

Rattlesnake Avoidance for Boise Dogs: 3 spring courses to keep them safe

3 Boise Experts That Will Transform Your Dog's Terrible Behavior

Need a Break from Your Fur Child? Here Are Boise's Best Dog-Sitters

Here are the top five spots for dogs to relax while their humans are away.
Get our free mobile app